U.S. Postal Inspection Service Guide to Preventing Mail Fraud

What Is Mail Fraud?

It’s a plan to get cash or something of significant worth from you by offering an item, administration, or speculation opportunity that does not satisfy its cases. Examiners must demonstrate the cases were purposefully distorted and that the mail was utilized to do the plan.

Albeit most mail-arrange organizations are straightforward and remain behind their items and administrations, shockingly there are a couple of spoiled apples who give post office based mail promoters an awful name. They cheat individuals by hawking useless items, therapeutic misrepresentation, and pyramid schemes. Some fly-by-evenings take your cash and send you nothing.

Deceitful organizations wouldn’t fret exploiting an unwary client. “Give the purchaser a chance to be careful” is their saying — and you may be the purchaser.

Mail fraudsters regularly depend on a similar old traps. You may even be comfortable with some of them. The accompanying pages incorporate a portion of the more typical mail extortion conspires and related shopper issues. Watch out for them!

Sweepstakes and ‘Free’ Prizes

It happens each day. A great many individuals are advised via mail that they have won a free prize. As a rule, it’s a postcard that says your prize will be one of four or five “profitable” things — like another vehicle, a shading TV, or a $1,000 investment funds security.

Regularly, swindlers whose sole intention is to scam you mail these takes note. When you contact the organization by telephone to guarantee your prize, the trick craftsman will reveal to you that you are required to pay a “handling” or “protection” expense and weight you to give out your Visa number. Try not to do it! The swindler may make a large number of dollars in unapproved charges to your record. On the off chance that you decline to give out your Visa number, be careful with the swindler’s other trick—persuading you to cover the preparing or protection charge by sending a check for many dollars by medium-term dispatch, or by wiring the expense to a man or business in Canada, Costa Rica, or another remote area.

 

Advertisements

How to Contact the U.S. Postal Inspection Service
If you believe you’ve been victimized by a scam involving the U.S. Mail, you can get help by contacting your nearest Postal Inspection Service office in one of three ways:

Call 1-877-876-2455 (press option “4” to report suspected mail fraud).
Visit postalinspectors.uspis.gov to report suspected fraud online.
Mail your queries to this address:
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS SERVICE CENTER

ATTN: MAIL FRAUD

222 S RIVERSIDE PLZ STE 1250

CHICAGO IL 60606-6100

 

UNITED STATES POSTAL INSPECTION SERVICE

WASHINGTON DC 20260-2169

ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

 

To learn more about mail fraud or to report suspected fraud, visit the U.S. Postal Inspection Web Site at postalinspectors.uspis.gov

United States Postal Inspection Service

Publication 300-A

June 2010

PSN 7610-04-000-6946

LEGAL
Privacy Policy ›
Terms of Use ›
FOIA ›
No FEAR Act EEO Data ›
ON ABOUT.USPS.COM
Newsroom ›
USPS Service Alerts ›
Forms & Publications ›
Careers ›
Site Index ›
ON USPS.COM
USPS.com Home ›
Buy Stamps & Shop ›
Print a Label with Postage ›
Customer Service ›
Delivering Solutions to the Last Mile ›
OTHER USPS SITES
Business Customer Gateway ›
Postal Inspectors ›
Inspector General ›
Postal Explorer ›
Copyright© 2018 USPS. All Rights Reserved.